Old-fashioned food is a hit

Go on a flavoursome journey in traditional Danish cuisine where dinner courses are variations on a theme of meat, potatoes and gravy. This is solid authentic food that really satisfies and makes your taste buds rejoice.

In Horsens, a Danish beef hamburger, fried pork belly, filled patty shells, open sandwiches and Danish pastry is never out of fashion.

Do you prefer gastronomic experiences or dishes from other food cultures?

Do not worry. There is something here for everyone.

Fried pork belly

The most famous Danish dish of all is probably crispy fried pork belly with boiled potatoes and parsley sauce – often accompanied by pickled beetroot and gherkins. The Wednesday menu at Korning Kro includes fried pork belly.

Hotel Pejsegården also serves Danish food. This also applies to the Dollys a restaurant located at the Horsens harbour where fried pork belly is served up six days a week. Classic dishes such as fried steak tartare, beef sandwich with soft onions and pickled beetroot as well as lemon mousse.

If you are a group of more than ten persons, Café Gaslight at Denmark’s Industrial Museum serves food of the decade from the 1950s, 1960s, 1970s or 1980s, made to order.

Revive childhood memories on the island of Alrø

If you are passionate about enjoying Danish food in beautiful surroundings, we highly recommend a trip to the cosy island of Alrø where you find several good eateries whose menus include classic Danish dishes.

Enjoy the views of the fjord and revive happy childhood memories while relishing a “Shooting Star” or a fried steak tartare at Møllegården – a farm which is included in the works of author Morten Korch. Or look forward to the omelette with fried pork belly, the fried fillet of plaice, pork tenderloin stew or layer cake at Alrø Traktørsted whose décor imparts a feeling of having travelled back in time.

Another eatery on the island is Café Alrø, whose filled patty shells are famous. Would you be content with one?

Danish produce

Fresh Danish produce of prime quality is being rated ever higher. A significant number of the Horsens eateries prepare their food from proper, Danish produce – and in many cases local produce – to make the taste experience even more special.

If you eat at Kokken ud af huset, the restaurant at Stensballegaard Golf Club, you will experience this. However, Hotel Opus also focuses on using vegetables with Danish roots in the preparation of its food.

Open sandwiches

Denmark is world-famous for its open sandwiches, known locally as “smørrebrød”.

Det Lille Røgeri serves both shooting stars and open sandwiches in addition to offering a popular and totally tasty seafood buffet.

Smørrebrød is an open sandwich whose base is a slice of buttered rye bread and which is then topped with a good layer of cold meats – for example, rolled seasoned meat, vegetable mayonnaise and onions; liver pâté, bacon, jelly and fresh onion rings or a breaded fish fillet, prawns, asparagus and tartare sauce.

The Danes have eaten open sandwiches since about 1880 when the industrialisation caused many workers to be away from home all day and therefore needed packed lunches.

Denmark’s national dish

In 2014, the Ministry of Environment and Food of Denmark named fried pork belly the national dish of Denmark. ”Smørrebrød” and beef burgers finished second and third, respectively.

Danish pastry

Did you know that the pastries known worldwide by the English name “Danish” dates from 1850?

A strike among Danish bakers meant that the bakeries had to hire Austrian bakers, amongst other, who brought with them previously unknown baking traditions and techniques to Denmark.

Their pastry was adapted to Danish taste and, thus, the foundation was laid for the Danish pastry or “Wiener bread” available from Danish bakeries today.